Is it time to create the 2.0 version of yourself?

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Do you ever wish you could undo the way you are perceived by the people around you? Like most people, you’ve probably spent years cultivating a version of yourself that is now ingrained into the minds of everyone in your social sphere. You’ve in a way been pigeon-holed. And maybe it’s a really comfortable pigeon-hole that has afforded you an abundant life. There’s nothing wrong with that; in fact, it’s most likely great. But sometimes we can feel like the way we perceive ourselves and the way we are perceived by others is not in alignment, and that can cause us discomfort. …


Stanford neuroscientist explains “The Physiological Sigh.”

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I was recently on a flight from Dallas to Las Vegas. After deftly dodging potential human Covid hazards inside the airport, I was finally herded to my seat near the back of the plane. It appeared I had a row to myself. I had manifested this. Thank you, universe.

Time ticked by as I anxiously awaited the flight attendants to shut the door and lock out any stragglers that would ruin my happiness by sitting in my row. The trickle of humans seemed to have completely dried up and takeoff was imminent. …


According to a famous study on delayed gratification.

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Last Saturday night I had a bulletproof plan for my Sunday. I had my alarm set for 5:30 am and was going to attack the day like a honey badger. Do honey badgers take Sundays off? Hell no they don’t. They slam their face into an angry bees’ nest, embrace the pain, and take what is theirs!

The day was going to start with a three-mile run just to get the blood pumping. After that, I was going to smash the keyboard and bang out 2000 words like a champ while I enjoyed my morning coffee. The grocery store was next because my fridge was empty. I was going to fill it with a kaleidoscope of fruits, vegetables and lean meat. …


Tip: It helps to think like a kid.

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We were barely five years old when my next-door neighbour Josh and I became obsessed with birds. The freedom they had, the grace, the flying. My favourite being the wise old owl. One fine weekend I decided that, like an owl, I too wanted to fly.

I recruited Josh and we spent all afternoon in my basement crafting our wings out of cardboard and red construction paper. It was an incredible feat of engineering and we would be fastening them to our arms with duct tape. It seemed impossible to fail.

When we finished, we would take the ladder from my parents’ shed, climb onto the roof of my house, and set sail. It was autumn at the time so of course we would build a pile of leaves in the backyard to break our fall if something went terribly wrong. …


It comes down to dopamine and ‘subjective rewards.’

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Photo credit: yns plt

David Goggins is revered in the community of high performing athletes. A retired Navy SEAL, phrases like “toughest man alive” and “fittest man alive” tend to be bandied about when his name is brought up. He is regarded by many as one of the top endurance athletes in the world.

Goggins is known for pushing his body to freakish limits that will elicit a gag reflex from the common spectator. He entered his first 100-mile race on a whim when he found out he could support an important military cause. …


You are not born with charisma, it is learned.

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I was a bumbling fresh-faced 15-year-old the first time I realized the power of charisma and confidence. My friends Myles, Jeff and I were sitting in Myles’ car (he was 16 and had his license) in the dilapidated parking lot of an unsavoury downtown establishment in which women took their clothes off on a stage and danced on poles for money. The French Maid was the name, and yes, it was a strip club.

I had never even been to a bar before, let alone a strip club, so the fact that us three pimply, barely-pubescent suburbanites were about to attempt what seemed to be the equivalent of a bank robbery, seems barely imaginable in retrospect. …


The time to live is now.

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Photo by Haus of Zeros on Unsplash

I learned a lot of things the first time I read Anthony Bourdain’s career-catapulting memoir, Kitchen Confidential. Including but not limited to: don’t order the fish on Mondays, never piss off the chef by asking for your steak well-done, and pass on the seafood frittata at brunch.

Uncle Tony regaled us with tantalizing tales of booze-soaked sous chefs, drug-addled dishwashers and philandering fry cooks, as we spelunked our way through the dark culinary caves that he led us through.

It was a fascinating behind-the-curtains look at a chef’s life, narrated with Ginsu-sharp wit and buttery-rich imagery by one of the world’s great storytellers. …


Use these techniques to make your writing pop.

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Photo by Natalie B from Pixabay

Writing in simple language is probably the most overlooked and underrated principle in the entire writing realm. The majority of your writing should be short, snappy and to the point.

There’s nothing worse than coming across an article you’re interested in, only to be greeted with long-winded, convoluted sentences riddled with out-of-place $5 words from a self-indulgent scribe.

As Stephen King said, trying to dress up your words to impress your audience is like dressing up your household pet in evening wear. It’s going to be embarrassing for both of you.

Does simple mean boring? Nothing could be further from the truth. But don’t forget to add the seasoning. Just as salt enhances the flavour of food to make it taste more like itself, sprinkling a few stylistic techniques into your piece can really bring out your writing umami and help produce more poetic prose. …


Apply these and watch your happiness soar.

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Back in 2002, I went on my first backpacking trip to South America. One night, after enjoying an evening of drinks and dancing at Mr. Frog’s nightclub in Lima, Peru, I was walking back to my hostel when I was approached by a child no older than seven on a street corner.

She was as cute as a button with an infectious smile and bubbly little personality. She started chatting me up with her limited English and held out a bag of candy, offering me a piece in exchange for a couple of my Peruvian soles.

I don’t think I had ever truly understood privilege until that moment. Here I was, a foreigner out on the town spending money and partying in this little girl’s country, while her parents had sent her out to work the night shift to try to make a few dollars to help feed the family. …


Red Flag #5 — The penis incident.

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New love. What a drug it is. An unrivalled exhilaration that can lift you so high that you wondered how you ever got by without it. A blissful, intoxicating fog that can blind you like staring into the sun. A drug that has caused more delight and damage than heroine could ever dream about.

The infamous love-drug has many dealers and comes in a wide range of costs. My pusher at this particular time was e-harmony and I was happy with the $19.95 monthly price tag.

Her profile picture screamed sexual napalm and seduced me the second I saw it. …

About

Ryan Hagen

I took a walk through this beautiful world. Journalism/Communications grad Freelancer/Traveler/Location-independent

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